Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of economise.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Well, the advantage of economy picking in some situations is that it "economises" the movement of your right hand.

    All Updates @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com

  • The diction is taut and spare: "flip-flop over/tarmac" economises, possibly, by compressing foot-wear into verb-of-motion; "exchange the weather" wastes no time on chit-chat.

    Poem of the week: Pier by Vona Groarke

  • Yet amongst the shoals of literature on Home Rule problems and finance, I can find no enlightenment as to how the transit problem is to be solved under the new conditions; _i. e._ how any Home Rule Government, whether it has control of Customs and Excise or not, and however it economises, is to find the money necessary to buy out the Irish railways and canals.

    Against Home Rule (1912) The Case for the Union

  • The wise man economises time as he economises money.

    Life and Conduct

  • Most men are under military discipline, and every household economises.

    What is Coming?

  • Chinese and Japanese “Swanpan” economises by dividing the line into two parts, the beads on one side representing five times the value of those on the other.

    The Earliest Arithmetics in English

  • "He economises in the wash," she soliloquised, with wrinkling nostril and curling lip.

    Sisters

  • It seems as though the creature recognises the impossibility of renewing its store of liquid, and so economises the little it possesses, using only just so much as is necessary in order to escape as quickly as possible from surroundings which are strange to its inherited instincts.

    Social Life in the Insect World

  • It was that Sforza who murdered his young nephew by slow poison, yet was so susceptible of religious impressions that he blended mere earthly passion with a sort of religious sentimentalism, and who took for his device the mulberry-tree -- symbol, in its long delay and sudden yielding of flowers and fruit together, of a wisdom which economises all forces for an opportunity of sudden and sure effect.

    The Renaissance: studies in art and poetry

  • Sforza who murdered his young nephew by slow poison, yet was so susceptible of religious impressions that he blended mere earthly passions with a sort of religious sentimentalism, and who took for his device the mulberry-tree -- symbol, in its long delay and sudden yielding of flowers and fruit together, of a wisdom which economises all forces for an opportunity of sudden and sure effect.

    The Renaissance Studies in Art and Poetry

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