Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun dated The European Currency Unit (symbol ), a currency used in the European Community before the euro.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Each currency was pegged to an artificial currency unit known as the ecu, the predecessor of the euro.

    CounterPunch

  • Each currency was pegged to an artificial currency unit known as the ecu, the predecessor of the euro.

    Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

  • I let my buddy drive my 96 LSC to get lunch for himself, his car is in the shop getting some kind of ecu work done (2006 sti).

    Lincoln vs Cadillac

  • On air, Colbert has chided the pope as an "ecu-menace" for his outreach to other faiths, referred to non-Catholics as "heathens and the excommunicated" and calls those who believe in evolution "monkey men."

    The Quiet Faith Behind Colbert's Right-Wing Funnyman

  • On air, Colbert has chided the pope as an "ecu-menace" for his outreach to other faiths, referred to non-Catholics as "heathens and the excommunicated" and calls those who believe in evolution "monkey men."

    The Quiet Faith Behind Colbert's Right-Wing Funnyman

  • On air, Colbert has chided the pope as an "ecu-menace" for his outreach to other faiths, referred to non-Catholics as "heathens and the excommunicated" and calls those who believe in evolution "monkey men."

    The Quiet Faith Behind Colbert's Right-Wing Funnyman

  • In 1726, Joseph Bonnier's careful and frugal father died, leaving his twenty-four-year-old son with a fortune worth ten billion francs and a governmental position which paid, possibly unofficially, one hundred thousand écu, or five or six hundred thousand livres (an ecu, just before the Revolution, being equivalent to about $25 in 2006).

    Archive 2008-05-01

  • An “ecu” is also the name of the gold or silver coins that were used in France starting with the reign of Louis IX in 1266, so that was an easy name for French people to remember when they learned they would be forced to give up their beloved French francs.

    “Money, money, money” (English)

  • An “ecu” is also the name of the gold or silver coins that were used in France starting with the reign of Louis IX in 1266, so that was an easy name for French people to remember when they learned they would be forced to give up their beloved French francs.

    Archive 2010-05-01

  • In 1726, Joseph Bonnier's careful and frugal father died, leaving his twenty-four-year-old son with a fortune worth ten billion francs and a governmental position which paid, possibly unofficially, one hundred thousand écu, or five or six hundred thousand livres (an ecu, just before the Revolution, being equivalent to about $25 in 2006).

    The Death and Resurrection of a Cabinet

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