Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of efflux.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "effluxes" about which the Atomists spoke, is not like the efflux, a diminished object, but a mode of motion, mediating between the object and the faculty.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 1: Aachen-Assize

  • Empedocles says that these images are caused by certain effluxes which, meeting together and resting upon the superficies of the mirror, are perfected by that fiery element emitted by the said mirror, which transforms withal the air that surrounds it.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • There was no way their discharge, their rushing, armed effluxes could be stayed by the men here.

    Renegades Of Gor

  • In sensation, the thing perceived produces images by means of effluxes which impinge upon the soul-atom.

    The Approach to Philosophy

  • Nile appeareth at the command of thy mouth; thou makest men to live on the effluxes that proceed from thy members, and thou makest every field to flourish.

    The Literature of the Ancient Egyptians

  • For owing to the great difference in the distances from the earth of the origin and extremity of such vast effluxes, the light proceeding from their various parts is transmitted to our eyes in notably different intervals of time.

    A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century Fourth Edition

  • And as the advocates of that theory used these terms to designate the different effluxes from the central Being, Paul may have borrowed their phraseology in order to refute their doctrine.

    A Commentary on the Epistle to the Ephesians

  • The probable efflux of bullion from the Bank scarcely affects it at all; even the real efflux affects it but little; if the open market did not believe that the Bank rate would be altered in consequence of such effluxes the market rate would not rise.

    Lombard Street : a description of the money market

  • Of the flood of the effluxes of rivers, on the strand, where it tarries not long.

    Y Gododin A Poem of the Battle of Cattraeth

  • And therefore it is no wonder, if God can torment where we see no tormentor, and comfort where we behold no comforter; he can do it by immediate emanations from himself, by continual effluxes of those powers and virtues, which he was pleased to implant in a weaker and fainter measure in created agents.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. VI.

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