Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act or practice of self-management.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

The term was first proposed by Thomas Schelling in his paper Egonomics, or the Art of Self-Management.

Examples

  • For nearly two years into this project, that view seemed justified by both micro and macro egonomics.

    Egonomics

  • Humility is the first principle of egonomics because of its unique ability to open minds.

    Egonomics

  • Our appetite for veracity is the third and final principle of egonomics, and the subject of the final chapter.

    Egonomics

  • That usually means change, and change is the very point of egonomics.

    Egonomics

  • I highly recommend egonomics to managers, researchers, and students.

    Egonomics

  • Veracity is the third principle of egonomics that keeps ego working for us rather than against us.

    Egonomics

  • Of the interviews we conducted for the study of egonomics, one of the more remarkable set of reflexes we observed was that of Jim Thyen.

    Egonomics

  • See also specific topic egonomics: definition of, function of, three principles of, See also curiosity; humility; veracity

    Egonomics

  • As we mentioned earlier, egonomics is a study of great moments, not great leaders.

    Egonomics

  • Fused with humility and curiosity, veracity is the third principle of egonomics that keeps the capital of ego working for us rather than against us.

    Egonomics

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