Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. alternative form of necromancy, used by Sir Richard Burton.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Coined by Sir Richard Burton from Middle English forms of "necromancy", such as egremauncey and egremauncye in the quotations below.

Examples

  • Often he uses these words with excellent effect, as, for example, "egromancy," [FN#473] in the sentence: "Nor will the egromancy be dispelled till he fall from the horse;" but unfortunately he is picturesque at all costs.

    The Life of Sir Richard Burton

  • Al – Sahr, magic or the black art proper, gramarye, egromancy, while Al — Simiyá is white magic, electro-biology, a kind of natural and deceptive magic, in which drugs and perfumes exercise an important action.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Then she stood up; and, pronouncing some words to me unintelligible, she said: — By virtue of my egromancy become thou half stone and half man; whereupon I became what thou seest, unable to rise or to sit, and neither dead nor alive.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Moreover, by the might of his egromancy he hath made a staff, in three pieces, and this he planteth in the earth and conjureth over it; whereupon flesh and blood issue from the first piece, sweet milk from the second and wheat and barley from the third; then he withdraweth the staff and returneth to his place which is hight the

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • “Know that my father hath promised me in marriage to a wicked magician who brought him, as a gift, a horse of black wood, and hath bewitched him with his craft and his egromancy; but, as for me, I will none of him, and would, because of him, I had never come into this world!”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • “Nor will the egromancy be dispelled till he fall from his horse.”

    The Life of Sir Richard Burton

  • “By virtue of my egromancy become thou half stone and half man.”

    The Life of Sir Richard Burton

  • "By virtue of my egromancy become thou half stone and half man."

    The Life of Sir Richard Burton

  • [FN#468] "Nor will the egromancy be dispelled till he fall from his horse."

    The Life of Sir Richard Burton

  • But the daughter of my uncle (this gazelle) had learned gramarye and egromancy and clerkly craft [FN#46] from her childhood; so she bewitched that son of mine to a calf, and my handmaid (his mother) to a heifer, and made them over to the herdsman's care.

    Arabian nights. English

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