Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Possessing electrical polarity; positively electrified at one end, or on one surface, and negatively at the other; -- said of a conductor.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having, as an electrical conductor, one end or surface positive and the other negative.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • That every different metal and electrolyte has a different class of motions, and in consequence of this, they also, by contact alone with each other at the same temperature, become electro-polar.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 443, June 28, 1884

  • Also, when heating a voltaic pair, the heat is applied to two metals, both of which are previously electro-polar by contact with each other as well as by contact with the liquid; but when heating one junction of a metal and liquid couple, the metal has not been previously rendered electro-polar by contact with a different one, and is therefore in a somewhat different state.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 443, June 28, 1884

  • In accordance with this theory, if we take a thermo-electric pair consisting of a non-corrodible metal and an electrolyte (the two being already electro-polar by mutual contact), and heat one of their points of contact, the molecular motions of the heated end of each substance at the junction are altered; and as thermo-electric energy in such combinations usually increases by rise of temperature, the metal and liquid, each singly, usually becomes more electro polar.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 443, June 28, 1884

  • That each metal (or electrolyte), when unequally heated, has to a certain extent an unlike class of motions in its differently heated parts, and behaves in those parts somewhat like two metals (or electrolytes), and those unlike motions are enabled, through the intermediate conducting portion of the substance, to render those parts electro-polar.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 443, June 28, 1884

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