electromotograph love

electromotograph

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A name sometimes applied to a peculiar telephone-receiver invented by Edison.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It will be understood, of course, that the electromotograph is a receiving and relaying instrument.

    Edison, His Life and Inventions, vol. 2

  • The principle of the electromotograph was utilized by Edison in more ways than one, first of all in telegraphy at this juncture.

    Edison, His Life and Inventions, vol. 1

  • Another notable use of the electromotograph principle was in its adaptation to the receiver in Edison's loud-speaking telephone, on which United States Patent No. 221,957 was issued November 25, 1879.

    Edison, His Life and Inventions, vol. 2

  • The electromotograph is shown diagrammatically in Figs. 1 and 2, in plan and vertical section respectively.

    Edison, His Life and Inventions, vol. 2

  • These electrostatic impulses are transmitted inductively to the elevated condensing surface at the distant point, and are made audible by the electromotograph connected in the ground circuit with such distant condensing surface. ''

    Edison, His Life and Inventions, vol. 2

  • It should be stated that Edison did not confine himself to the working of the electromotograph by the slipping of surfaces through the action of incoming current, but by varying the character of the surfaces in contact the frictional effect might be intensified by

    Edison, His Life and Inventions, vol. 2

  • For receiving signals I locate in said circuit between the condensing surface and the ground a diaphragm sounder, which is preferably one of my electromotograph telephone receivers.

    Edison, His Life and Inventions, vol. 2

  • Edison's electromotograph comprised an ingeniously arranged apparatus in which two surfaces, normally in contact with each other, were caused to alternately adhere by friction or slip by reason of electrochemical decomposition.

    Edison, His Life and Inventions, vol. 2

  • It should be stated that Edison did not confine himself to the working of the electromotograph by the slipping of surfaces through the action of incoming current, but by varying the character of the surfaces in contact the frictional effect might be intensified by the electrical current.

    Edison, His Life and Inventions

  • Another notable use of the electromotograph principle was in its adaptation to the receiver in Edison's loud-speaking telephone, on which

    Edison, His Life and Inventions

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