Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of elegancy.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Some curious old paintings representing banqueting scenes, formerly in _Carlisle House_ were carefully preserved until the last few years, in the drawing-room of the corner house, when they were removed to make room for some needed "elegancies" of the modern print shops.

    Notes and Queries, Number 28, May 11, 1850

  • "Never mind – it's not wet," he said, pulling his cap over his eyes and plunging into his coat, regardless of the "elegancies" that afflicted him.

    Rose in Bloom

  • "Never mind it's not wet," he said, pulling his cap over his eyes and plunging into his coat, regardless of the "elegancies" that afflicted him.

    Rose In Bloom

  • Like all digital technologies, the iPhone has yet to achieve the hard-grained, Spartan elegancies of the steely Leatherman.

    Self-Reliance 2008

  • It was sad, really, to see the simple elegancies of life dwindle away even as you watched.

    Tran Siberian

  • Lavinia was too timid to oppose reason to this suffering; and Mr. Tyrold, already cruelly apprehensive the obscurity of their recluse lives contributed to her depression, and believing she compared her present privations to the lost elegancies of Beech Park, sighed heavily, yet said he was glad she would remove from a spot in which reminiscence was so painful.

    Camilla

  • Strict neatness and cleanliness of person, seemed to intimate, that if poor, she was not reduced to squalid or heart-broken distress, and that she was still sufficiently attached to life to retain a taste for its decencies, if not its elegancies.

    The Abbot

  • She feels as yet no privation; she suffers no loss of accustomed conveniences nor elegancies.

    The Wife, by Washington Irving.

  • Oh, but, my friend! to think what a blow I am to give to all her future prospects - how I am to strike her very soul to the earth, by telling her that her husband is a beggar! that she is to forego all the elegancies of life - all the pleasures of society - to shrink with me into indigence and obscurity!

    The Wife, by Washington Irving.

  • Sweeping past the gold and silver demonstration on the sideboard as if it were heaped – up dirt, and deigning to bestow no look upon the elegancies around her, she took her place at his board for the first time, and sat, like a statue, at the feast.

    Dombey and Son

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