Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Obsolete form of elegiac.
  • n. Obsolete form of elegiac.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The epick, lyrick, elegiack, every sort of poetry he touched upon, (and he had touched upon a great variety,) was raised to its proper height, and the differences between each of them observed with a judicious accuracy.

    Lives of the Poets, Volume 1

  • He did not miscarry in this attempt for want of skill either in lyrick or elegiack poetry.

    Lives of the Poets, Volume 1

  • Queen Mary conferred upon both those plays the honour of her presence; and when she died, soon after, Congreve testified his gratitude by a despicable effusion of elegiack pastoral; a composition in which all is unnatural, and yet nothing is new.

    The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. in Nine Volumes Volume the Eighth: The Lives of the Poets, Volume II

  • He expressed still more attention to Marlborough and his family by an elegiack pastoral on the marquis of Blandford, which could be prompted only by respect or kindness; for neither the duke nor dutchess desired the praise, or liked the cost of patronage.

    The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. in Nine Volumes Volume the Eighth: The Lives of the Poets, Volume II

  • Why Hammond or other writers have thought the quatrain of ten syllables elegiack, it is difficult to tell.

    The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. in Nine Volumes Volume the Eighth: The Lives of the Poets, Volume II

  • _pentameters elegiack_: and not by coupling them together, but by accompt to make their verse of a iust measure and not defectiue or superflous: our odde sillable is not altogether of that nature, but is in a maner drownd and supprest by the flat accent, and shrinks away as it were inaudible and by that meane the odde verse comes almost to be an euen in euery mans hearing.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • Their hemmimeris or halfe foote serued not by license Poeticall or necessitie of words, but to bewtifie and exornate the verse by placing one such halfe foote in the middle Cesure, & one other in the end of the verse, as they vsed all their pentameters elegiack: and not by coupling them together, but by accompt to make their verse of a iust measure and not defectiue or superflous: our odde sillable is not altogether of that nature, but is in a maner drownd and supprest by the flat accent, and shrinks away as it were inaudible and by that meane the odde verse comes almost to be an euen in euery mans hearing.

    The Arte of English Poesie

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.