Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of elocutionist.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And it was about midnight last night and I'd finally finished revising my chapter on shibboleths and elocutionists and I picked up another volume by Terry Pratchett but I've temporarily stalled on that Hogfather: excellent; Maskerade: minor but entertaining; Thief of Time: I like that Susan character but book didn't live up to Hogfather standard; Interesting Times, too goofy to be really enjoyable.

    Stephen Elliott's Happy Baby

  • And it was about midnight last night and I'd finally finished revising my chapter on shibboleths and elocutionists and I picked up another volume by Terry Pratchett but I've temporarily stalled on that Hogfather: excellent; Maskerade: minor but entertaining; Thief of Time: I like that Susan character but book didn't live up to Hogfather standard; Interesting Times, too goofy to be really enjoyable.

    Archive 2004-08-01

  • Politicians, public speakers, aspiring writers, actors, elocutionists, singers, inventors (most of them he had never seen or heard of) cheerfully asked him for a recommendation as to their abilities and projects.

    Mark Twain: A Biography

  • It had long been obvious (even to elocutionists) that circumstance could aggravate the disorder—for example, Oskar Guttmann (an elocutionist) had warned in 1893 that “nothing is more adapted to promote stuttering than terror and fear.”

    Knotted Tongues

  • The elocutionists and the parlayers of gimmick cures held sway.

    Knotted Tongues

  • The elocutionists and the parlayers of gimmick cures held sway.

    Knotted Tongues

  • Overall, speech therapy in England and America fell into the hands of elocutionists, who relied on respiratory, vocal, and articulatory drills.

    Knotted Tongues

  • It had long been obvious (even to elocutionists) that circumstance could aggravate the disorder—for example, Oskar Guttmann (an elocutionist) had warned in 1893 that “nothing is more adapted to promote stuttering than terror and fear.”

    Knotted Tongues

  • Overall, speech therapy in England and America fell into the hands of elocutionists, who relied on respiratory, vocal, and articulatory drills.

    Knotted Tongues

  • But as we are no great elocutionists, or at all well conversant with the mysteries of

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 349, November, 1844

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