Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of embassador.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • McCain's parents were in the Panama Canal Zone as agents "embassadors" of the United States.

    Who will determine whether John McCain is a "natural-born citizen," qualified for the presidency?

  • Pg. 12, unusual spelling of "embassadors" retained.

    The Critic in the Orient

  • 'Up, and leaving my brother John to go somewhere else, I to church, and heard Mr. Mills (who is lately returned out of the country, and it seems was fetched in by many of the parishioners, with great state,) preach upon the authority of the ministers, upon these words, “We are therefore embassadors of Christ.”

    August 10th, 2006

  • In case you do not think that the chosen occasion, a state of the country speech at the National Assembly, was not picked for bombastic purpose I made the following montage the presence of all embassadors is, by protocol, required, for the many hours it takes, which adds of course to the moment.

    01/09/2005 - 01/16/2005

  • As we sat by the fire, the embassadors communicated their thoughts freely respecting the customs of their race.

    Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa

  • "The ambitious sought fame by associating themselves with the introduction of the plant and its cultivation; hence we find it named after cardinals, legates, and embassadors, while in compliment to Catherine, wife of Henry the Second, it was called the Queen's herb."

    Tobacco; Its History, Varieties, Culture, Manufacture and Commerce

  • David's wife, is his slave; his people, officers, and even embassadors are all his slaves; all are slaves to each other, and none are masters, unless it be the king.

    Is Slavery Sanctioned by the Bible?

  • I know that the persons of embassadors are sacred, and I know that it is a very high offense against the law of nations, which no civil judge of any court could justify, to invade this sacred right of the embassador, but every body knows that that is an exceptional case.

    History of the Thirty-Ninth Congress of the United States

  • Because the Government of the United States was vested with the exclusive authority in all cases depending upon the law of nations; and the law of nations saving from responsibility embassadors accredited to the United States, for civil debts, he who attempted to interfere offended against the Government, and he offended in relation to a subject exclusively committed to the General

    History of the Thirty-Ninth Congress of the United States

  • South Carolina had passed the ordinance of secession, and had sent commissioners or embassadors to negotiate a treaty with the general government.

    The Bay State Monthly — Volume 1, No. 6, June, 1884

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