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Examples

  • The work is greatly expanded by introductory matter and glosses, written by one E.K., and each eclogue is preceded by a carefully designed woodcut and followed by a motto or "embleme" summing up the attitude of each speaker.

    Shepheardes Calendar

  • The circle was widely venerated as the most perfect figure and therefore as “a clear embleme of eternity”

    HIERARCHY AND ORDER

  • It is to the soule, as wings to the foule: this also is a Scripture embleme to picture the Angels with wings, as in the hangings of the

    A Coal From The Altar, To Kindle The Holy Fire of Zeale In a Sermon Preached at a Generall Visitation at Ipswich

  • At least waies, I finde this opinion, confirmed by a pretie deuise or embleme that _Lucianus_ alleageth he saw in the pourtrait of _Hercules_ within the Citie of Marseills in

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • There is an equal delusion in both, and the one doth but seem to be the embleme or picture of the other: we are somewhat more than our selves in our sleeps, and the slumber of the body seems to be but the waking of the soul.

    The Second Part

  • He gone, comes Mr. Herbert, Mr. Honiwood's man, and dined with me, a very honest, plain, well-meaning man, I think him to be; and by his discourse and manner of life, the true embleme of an old ordinary serving-man.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete

  • Mr. Honiwood's man, and dined with me, a very honest, plain, well-meaning man, I think him to be; and by his discourse and manner of life, the true embleme of an old ordinary serving-man.

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Aug/Sep 1664

  • The cyclical pattern of the "monethes" -- name, woodcut, argument, eclogue, "embleme," gloss -- is enhanced by the repetition of graphic elements: argument in italics, eclogue in black letter, glosses in roman type.

    Shepheardes Calendar

  • This embleme is spoken of Thenot, as a moral of his former tale: namelye, that God, which is himselfe most aged, being before al ages, and without beginninge, maketh those, whom he loueth like to himselfe, in heaping yeares vnto theyre dayes, and blessing them wyth longe lyfe.

    Shepheardes Calendar

  • Of the deuice or embleme, and that other which the Greekes call Anagramma, and we the Posie transposed.

    The Arte of English Poesie

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