Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. embryonic; undeveloped

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Embryonic; undeveloped.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Same as embryonal.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Besides its action through its presence, which is immediate, the embryous membrane may also act as a ferment, active only after a development, varying in duration according to the conditions of temperature and the presence or absence of ferments in acting.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

  • The albuminous matter approaching nearest to cerealine is the diastase, for it is only a transformation of the cerealine during the germination, the proof of which may be had in analyzing the embryous membrane, which shows more diastase and less cerealine in proportion to the advancement of the germination: it differs, however, from the diastase by the action of heat, alcohol, etc.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

  • The bran now obtained is composed of the embryous membrane, a little flour adhering to it, and some traces of the teguments Nos. 2, 3, 4, and 5.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

  • It is seen that in every case the cerealine and the embryous membrane act together, and in an analogous manner; we shall shortly examine their effects on the digestion and in the phenomena of panification.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

  • No. 6 indicates the embryous membrane, which is only an expansion of the germ or embryo No. 10.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

  • At all events, when the blades of the embryous membrane, prepared as already stated, are exposed to a water bath at 212°, this tissue, in contact with the diluted starch, produces the same decomposition; the contact, however, should continue two or three hours in place of one.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

  • This action is due to the presence of the embryous membrane, for after four consecutive operations it still preserves its original weight.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

  • -- The cells composing the embryous membrane contain, as already stated, the cerealine, but after the germination they contain cerealine and diastase, that is to say, a portion of the cerealine changed into diastase, with which it has the greatest analogy.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

  • There exists, in reality, I repeat, a resemblance between the embryous membrane and the yeast; they have the same immediate composition; they are destroyed by the same poisons, deadened by the same temperatures, annihilated by the same agents, propagated in an analogous manner, and it might be said that the organic tissues endowed with life are only an agglomeration of fixed cells of ferments.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

  • Now, as we know all the parts constituting the berry of wheat, it will be easy to explain the phenomena of panification, and to conclude from the present moment that it is not indifferent to reject from the bread this embryous membrane where the agents of digestion are found, viz., the phosphoric bodies and the phosphate of chalk.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

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