Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. needing nourishment; hungry.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. needing nourishment

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The sudden spurt of rage had drained away, leaving her breathless and empty-bellied.

    A Breath of Snow and Ashes

  • He who had once tramped the pavements of the capital as a vagabond, unwashed and empty-bellied, had now assumed the powers of the once mighty Austrian Hapsburg emperors, as in Germany he had taken over those of the Hohenzollern kaisers.

    The Rise and Fall of Adolf Hitler

  • Sir PETER, with a very proper admiration of the pleasures of life, philosophises with a full stomach on the ignorance and wickedness of empty-bellied humanity; and Mr. HOBLER -- albeit in the present case the word is not reported -- doubtless cried "Amen!" to the wisdom of the alderman.

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, November 13, 1841

  • They had been turned out of work, packed in cattle-trucks, and had come down in sun by day and icy wind by night, empty-bellied, to pack off home again.

    From Capetown to Ladysmith An Unfinished Record of the South African War

  • There would be no use to fill the cans at present or start the conveyer to carry the empty-bellied fish to the cannery floor.

    El Diablo

  • Oh, hell, I can't talk about this thing, but I've watched the putty-faced, hollow-chested, empty-bellied kids -- that don't even have guts enough left to laugh ....

    Slippy McGee, Sometimes Known as the Butterfly Man

  • There was the time of the Great Famine, when the old men crouched empty-bellied to the fire, and let fall from their lips dim traditions of the ancient day when the Yukon ran wide open for three winters, and then lay frozen for three summers.

    The Law of Life

  • There was the time of the Great Famine, when the old men crouched empty-bellied to the fire, and from their lips fell dim traditions of the ancient day when the Yukon ran wide open for three winters, and then lay frozen for three summers.

    The Law of Life

  • But page on page of such facts as that both Shakespeare and Sophocles talk, one of "the belly - pinched wolf," the other of "the empty-bellied wolf," are apt to impress the reader -- and verily both Shakespeare and AEschylus talk of

    Shakespeare, Bacon, and the Great Unknown

  • Behold, the Lollards were at your gates, the Anabaptists were scaling your walls, the Hussites were knocking at your window-blinds, the lean and hungry were climbing your staircases, the empty-bellied coveted your dinner.

    Napoleon the Little

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