Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To strive to equal or excel, especially through imitation: an older pupil whose accomplishments and style I emulated.
  • transitive v. To compete with successfully; approach or attain equality with.
  • transitive v. Computer Science To imitate the function of (another system), as by modifications to hardware or software that allow the imitating system to accept the same data, execute the same programs, and achieve the same results as the imitated system.
  • adj. Obsolete Ambitious; emulous.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To attempt to equal or be the same as.
  • v. To copy or imitate, especially a person.
  • v. To feel a rivalry with; to be jealous of, to envy.
  • v. of a program or device: to imitate another program or device

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Striving to excel; ambitious; emulous.
  • transitive v. To strive to equal or to excel in qualities or actions; to imitate, with a view to equal or to outdo, to vie with; to rival.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To strive to equal or excel in qualities or actions; vie or compete with the character, condition, or performance of; rival imitatively or competitively: as, to emulate good or bad examples; to emulate one's friend or an ancient author.
  • To be a match or counterpart for; imitate; resemble.
  • To envy.
  • Emulative; eager to equal or excel.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. imitate the function of (another system), as by modifying the hardware or the software
  • v. strive to equal or match, especially by imitating
  • v. compete with successfully; approach or reach equality with

Etymologies

Latin aemulārī, aemulāt-, from aemulus, emulous; see emulous.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From the Latin aemulātiō ("strive"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • There was nothing at all except for a red-ink circle around the phrase "emulate the verbiage."

    Only One Person Could Write That

  • Perhaps "emulate" is the wrong word -- each region has its own qualities, of course.

    The New York Cork Report:

  • SSG Jeff (USAR): Andrew Jackson is hardly the sort of President I would want any President to emulate from a constitutional standpoint.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Is the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement Unconstitutional?

  • Andrew Jackson is hardly the sort of President I would want any President to emulate from a constitutional standpoint.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Is the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement Unconstitutional?

  • According to Webster's Dictionary, the word emulate means "to strive to equal or excel."

    British Blogs

  • But China's model is sui generis; its ­specific mode of governance is difficult to describe, much less emulate, which is why it is not up for export.

    The Economist: Correspondent's diary

  • "I think the guys who have been here and know how the Eagles play defense, it's our responsibility to kind of emulate what we've always done, which is play aggressive, attack the quarterback, try to cause turnovers," Bradley said.

    Columnist: Keith Groller

  • Sorry, Forgiven ... that's "emulate", not immolate, but Freud would have been proud.

    My Left Wing - Front Page

  • The iPhone might be one of the most popular mobile gaming platform but it is fair to say that the the touchscreen has proven to be a limited mean of controlling games despite apple's claim that it can virtually "emulate" any type of controller.

    Ubergizmo

  • "There's a common-sense approach to that," he said, adding that if he was going to "emulate" any City Council member, it would be District 2 City Council Member Kent Edmondson.

    The Examiner Home RSS

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