Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of engarland.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • O Bharata, there, flows in a westward course the sacred river Narmada, graced by Priyangu and mango trees, and engarlanded with thickest of canes.

    The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 Books 1, 2 and 3

  • To-day I consider as if the entire earth engarlanded with cities hath already been conquered, and as if the sons of Dhritarashtra have already been subdued.

    The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 Books 1, 2 and 3

  • Our only long tablecloth was a damask, engarlanded and diapered and resplendent with a colored border warranted to wash.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 26, September, 1880

  • O Bharata, there flows in a westward course the sacred river Narmada, graced by _Priyangu_ and mango trees, and engarlanded with thickest of canes.

    The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Translated into English Prose Vana Parva, Part 1

  • Not for an instant did he bow to fate: all shackled as he was, his legs engarlanded in heavy chains -- which he called his garters -- he tempered his merriment with the meditation of escape.

    A Book of Scoundrels

  • Her perceptions rose and sank, and, as they sank, the villa engarlanded, of which Owen had spoken, seemed there.

    Evelyn Innes

  • About her were villas engarlanded with reddening creeper.

    Evelyn Innes

  • From the tiny waist trailed yards of white faille, trimmed with tulle ruchings, frecked as a meadow with faintly-tinted daisies; the hips were engarlanded with daisies, and the flowers melted and bloomed amid snows of faille and tulle.

    Muslin

  • To-morrow I shall drive to breakfast, seeing Paris continuously unfolding, prospect after prospect, green swards, white buildings, villas engarlanded; to-day I drive to breakfast through the white torridities of Rue Blanche.

    Memoirs of My Dead Life

  • It is pleasant to notice everything in Paris, the flymen asleep on their box-seats, the little horses dozing beneath the chestnut trees, the bloused workmen leaning over a green-painted table in an arbour, drinking wine at sixteen sous the litre, the villas of Auteuil, rich woodwork, rich iron railings, and the summer hush about villas engarlanded.

    Memoirs of My Dead Life

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