Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of engrosser.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The annual elections for the state Assembly took place in late October, and as Pennsylvania historian Robert Brunhouse put it, “The fury against engrossers, Tories, and well-to-do Republicans in general presaged only one result.”

    Robert Morris

  • Wartime profiteers were “Rascally Tory Jew engrossers.”

    Robert Morris

  • Should ye set an oligarchy of twenty engrossers over it, to bring a famine upon our minds again, when we shall know nothing but what is measured to us by their bushel?

    Areopagitica

  • In one of the most vehement letters he ever wrote, Washington gave vent to his hatred of big-time war profiteers—the monopolizers, forestallers, and engrossers of condign punishment. . .

    Angel in the Whirlwind

  • The laws against forestallers and engrossers, who, it was currently believed, were leagued against both army and country, were powerless, as such laws always are.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 14, No. 85, November, 1864

  • (3 Oct., 1709) to put the law in force against all engrossers, forestallers and regraters of corn.

    London and the Kingdom - Volume II

  • The mayor in reply assured the secretary of state that there were no such engrossers in the city, but that the present dearness was caused by the exportation of large quantities of corn and grain to foreign countries.

    London and the Kingdom - Volume II

  • Should ye set an oligarchy of twenty engrossers [censors] over it, to bring a famine upon our minds again, when we shall know nothing but what is measured us by their bushel? ...

    Human Traits and their Social Significance

  • Royal Proclamation against engrossers of corn, 2 Jan.,

    London and the Kingdom - Volume I

  • In particular, although from about 1050 to the reformation the writing employed in the papal chancery did not noticeably differ from the ordinary book-hand familiar throughout Christendom, the engrossers of papal bulls, even after the sixteenth century, went on using an archaic and very artificial type of writing known as scrittura bollatica, with manifold contractions and an absence of all punctuation, which was practically undecipherable by ordinary readers.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 3: Brownson-Clairvaux

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