Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The act or process of entitling.
  • noun The state of being entitled.
  • noun A government program that guarantees and provides benefits to a particular group.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun a right granted by law or contract, especially to financial benefits from the government.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun the right to have something
  • noun something that one is entitled to
  • noun politics a legal obligation on a government to make payments to a person, business, or unit of government that meets the criteria set in law, such as social security in the US.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun right granted by law or contract (especially a right to benefits)

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

entitle + -ment

Examples

  • David Axelrod, a strategist for the president, called Mr. Romney's use of the term "entitlement nation" deeply offensive while speaking with reporters in Manhattan.

    NYT > Home Page

  • We've already analyzed the Orwellian strategy behind the phrase "entitlement reform," which is a well-crafted euphemism for "cutting services for the elderly."

    Richard (RJ) Eskow: The Ministry of Truth: New Fronts in the War on Social Security

  • And the term "entitlement" resonates with that word's other meaning - selfishness and the greedy assumption that one deserves to be served by others as in "he acts so entitled."

    Richard (RJ) Eskow: "Entitlement Reform" Is a Euphemism For Letting Old People Get Sick and Die

  • And the term "entitlement" resonates with that word's other meaning - selfishness and the greedy assumption that one deserves to be served by others as in "he acts so entitled."

    Richard (RJ) Eskow: "Entitlement Reform" Is a Euphemism For Letting Old People Get Sick and Die

  • Because the WebLogic documentation refers more frequently to entitlement than authorization, you will use the term entitlement to describe what a user can and cannot do or access once they have been authenticated.

    Enterprise IT Planet News

  • Because the WebLogic documentation refers more frequently to entitlement than authorization, you will use the term entitlement to describe what a user can and cannot do or access once they have been authenticated.

    Enterprise IT Planet News

  • Because the WebLogic documentation refers more frequently to entitlement than authorization, you will use the term entitlement to describe what a user can and cannot do or access once they have been authenticated.

    Enterprise IT Planet News

  • Because the WebLogic documentation refers more frequently to entitlement than authorization, you will use the term entitlement to describe what a user can and cannot do or access once they have been authenticated.

    Enterprise IT Planet News

  • Because the WebLogic documentation refers more frequently to entitlement than authorization, you will use the term entitlement to describe what a user can and cannot do or access once they have been authenticated.

    Enterprise IT Planet News

  • Because the WebLogic documentation refers more frequently to entitlement than authorization, you will use the term entitlement to describe what a user can and cannot do or access once they have been authenticated.

    Enterprise IT Planet News

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.