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Examples

  • The paleocene-eocene thermal maximum meant big temperature changes.

    AGU Day 2: The role of CO2 in the earth’s history | Serendipity

  • The paleocene-eocene thermal maximum meant big temperature changes.

    2009 December | Serendipity

  • The paleocene-eocene thermal maximum meant big temperature changes.

    2009 December 17 | Serendipity

  • The Acex research team drilled frozen sedimentary cores from the ocean floor, which can be dated to 55 million years ago, a period known as the palaeocene-eocene thermal maximum (PETM).

    2008 July 24 « Unambiguously Ambidextrous

  • The Acex research team drilled frozen sedimentary cores from the ocean floor, which can be dated to 55 million years ago, a period known as the palaeocene-eocene thermal maximum (PETM).

    Arctic Oil And The Abiotic Debate Again « Unambiguously Ambidextrous

  • I mean if i recall correctly there hasntt been primates in NA since eocene and so far we have only bipedal fossil apes found from Africa.

    Frame 352, and all that

  • No, but he does mention the cooling since the eocene explicitly.

    Unthreaded « Climate Audit

  • When once there has been a deposit of idea in the calm deep eocene of British rural mind, the impression will outlast any shallow deluge of the noblest education.

    Erema

  • There is, however, a material disadvantage suffered by those who use the railway, in that they miss the first view of the Cathedral city set in the midst of soft-swelling eocene hills, which comes as the first stage of the gradual unfolding of the tragic story.

    Beautiful Britain: Canterbury

  • At any rate, many hundreds of thousands of years, some millions of years, have passed by since in the eocene, at the beginning of the tertiary period, we find the traces of an abundant, varied, and highly developed mammalian life on the land masses out of which have grown the continents as we see them to-day.

    II. Biological Analogies in History

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