Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Of the character of an epidemic; epidemically diffused; epidemic.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Alternative form of epidemic.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Seldom, indeed, was any jealousy shown; they surrendered themselves to a kind of epidemical beatitude, to a contagious hope that they would all be cured whenever it should so please the Blessed Virgin.

    The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete Lourdes, Rome and Paris

  • Seldom, indeed, was any jealousy shown; they surrendered themselves to a kind of epidemical beatitude, to a contagious hope that they would all be cured whenever it should so please the Blessed Virgin.

    The Three Cities Trilogy: Lourdes, Volume 2

  • Seldom, indeed, was any jealousy shown; they surrendered themselves to a kind of epidemical beatitude, to a contagious hope that they would all be cured whenever it should so please the Blessed Virgin.

    The Three Cities Trilogy: Lourdes, Complete

  • The great cause of the present deplorable state of English poetry is to be attributed to that absurd and systematic depreciation of Pope, in which, for the last few years, there has been a kind of epidemical concurrence.

    Life of Lord Byron With His Letters And Journals

  • The great cause of the present deplorable state of English poetry is to be attributed to that absurd and systematic depreciation of Pope, in which, for the last few years, there has been a kind of epidemical concurrence.

    Life of Lord Byron, Vol. 5 (of 6) With His Letters and Journals

  • "The great cause of the present deplorable state of English poetry," writes Byron, "is to be attributed to that absurd and systematic depreciation of Pope in which, for the last few years, there has been a kind of epidemical concurrence.

    A History of English Romanticism in the Nineteenth Century

  • Dejection of spirits is an epidemical disease, and unless some fortunate event or other gives a turn to the disorder, in time it may prevail.

    Robert Morris

  • Dejection of spirits is an epidemical disease, and unless some fortunate event or other gives a turn to the disorder, in time it may prevail.

    Robert Morris

  • In this state of things, during winter, paraplegia set in, and attacked many, and some died speedily; and otherwise the disease prevailed much in an epidemical form, but persons remained free from all other diseases.

    Of The Epidemics

  • Dysenteries were epidemical during the summer, and some of those cases in which the hemorrhage occurred, terminated in dysentery, as happened to the slave of Eraton, and to

    Of The Epidemics

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