Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The epidermis.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The epidermis.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as epidermis.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Compare French épiderme. See epidermis.

Examples

  • The transverse section of a leaf may be conveniently divided into three distinct parts -- 1, the dermal tissues, epiderm, hypoderm and stomata

    The Genus Pinus

  • Leaves binate, from 6 to 11 cm. long, the epiderm thick, hypoderm strong, resin-ducts medial.

    The Genus Pinus

  • Leaves binate, from 12 to 16 cm. long, the epiderm thick, hypoderm of two or three rows of cells; resin-ducts medial or with an occasional external duct.

    The Genus Pinus

  • Under the action of hydrochloric acid the hypoderm is sharply differentiated from the epiderm by a distinct reddish tint, but without the aid of a reagent the two tissues do not always differ in appearance.

    The Genus Pinus

  • Leaves binate, from 3 to 8 cm. long, the epiderm very thick, hypoderm weak; resin-ducts external.

    The Genus Pinus

  • The cells of epiderm and hypoderm may be so similar that they appear to form a single tissue.

    The Genus Pinus

  • The stomata of Pine leaves are depressed below the surface and interrupt the continuity of epiderm and hypoderm.

    The Genus Pinus

  • In most species, however, the epiderm is distinct, while the cells of the hypoderm are either uniform, with equally thin or thick walls -- or biform, with very thin walls in the outer row of cells and very thick walls in the inner row or rows of cells -- or multiform, with cell-walls gradually thicker toward the centre of the leaf.

    The Genus Pinus

  • Leaves binate, from 9 to 16 cm. long, the epiderm thick, hypoderm conspicuous, resin-ducts medial.

    The Genus Pinus

  • It was probable that, in the lapse of ages, improved systems of moral and intellectual training would appreciably, perhaps considerably, elevate the involuntary and even the unconscious instincts of human nature; but up to the present day culture, as far as he could see, might be said to have affected only the mental epiderm of those lives which had been brought under its influence.

    Tess of the d'Urbervilles

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