Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Resembling epilepsy or any of its symptoms.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Resembling epilepsy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Resembling epilepsy.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Resembling epilepsy: as, an epileptoid attack.
  • n. A person who is prone to have epileptic seizures.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

epilept(ic) + -oid.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From epileptic +‎ -oid.

Examples

  • You've probably had the weird epileptoid experience of saying a word over and over until it ceases to denote and becomes very strange and arbitrary and odd-feeling — imagine that happening with your own name.

    David Foster Wallace

  • He rather believes that they are more closely allied to the epileptoid temperament.

    Studies in Forensic Psychiatry

  • If we adopt the assumption, then of course what medical materialism insists on must be true in a general way, if not in every detail: Saint Paul certainly had once an epileptoid, if not an epileptic seizure; George Fox was an hereditary degenerate;

    The Varieties of Religious Experience

  • At some future time I hope to take up the epileptoid convulsions and show their relationship and variation from that of the mechanism of essential epilepsy.

    The Journal of Abnormal Psychology

  • "Genius," says Dr. Lombroso, "is a symptom of hereditary degeneration of the epileptoid variety, and is allied to moral insanity."

    The Varieties of Religious Experience

  • The case of which there might be most doubt, on account of its suggesting so strongly an epileptoid seizure, was the case of M. Ratisbonne.

    The Varieties of Religious Experience

  • If we adopt the assumption, then of course what medical materialism insists on must be true in a general way, if not in every detail: Saint Paul certainly had once an epileptoid, if not an epileptic seizure; George Fox was an hereditary degenerate; Carlyle was undoubtedly auto-intoxicated by some organ or other, no matter which -- and the rest.

    The Varieties of Religious Experience

  • For this reason Lombroso calls the occasional criminals "criminaloids," in order to show precisely that they have a distinctly abnormal constitution, though in a less degree than the born criminals, just as we have the metal and the metalloid, the epileptic and the epileptoid.

    Criminal Sociology

  • And finally, we pass from the occasional criminal to the criminal of passion, who is but a species of the other, and who further, with his neurotic and epileptoid temperament, not infrequently approximates to the criminal of unsound mind.

    Criminal Sociology

  • They are as a rule persons of previous good behaviour, sanguine or nervous by temperament, of excessive sensibility, unlike born or habitual criminals, and they are often of a neurotic or epileptoid temperament, of which their crimes may be, strictly speaking, an unrecognised consequence.

    Criminal Sociology

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