Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. equality

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Equality; evenness.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state of being equal, in any sense; equality.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

equal +‎ -ness

Examples

  • So, I think Bush will be -- this is not a status quo vote, despite the evenness or the equalness in the vote outcome.

    CNN Transcript - Special Event: Election 2000: Bush, Gore Locked in Unprecedented Fight for Control of the White House - November 8, 2000

  • Those men go on, as they say, in one uniform tenor of speaking, bringing nothing except their facility and equalness of language; or else they add something, like reliefs on a pedestal, and so they embellish their whole oration, with trifling ornaments of words and ideas.

    The Orations of Marcus Tullius Cicero, Volume 4

  • _Equity_ literally means _equalness_; and if it be admitted that there were even the vaguest ideas of equity in these primitive eras, it must be admitted that there was some appreciation of the equalness of men's liberties to pursue the objects of life -- some appreciation, therefore, of the essential principle of national equilibrium.

    Essays on Education and Kindred Subjects Everyman's Library

  • I tell you what though, brother, 'said Dennis, cocking his hat for the convenience of scratching his head, and looking gravely at Hugh,' it's worthy of notice, as a proof of the amazing equalness and dignity of our law, that it don't make no distinction between men and women.

    Barnaby Rudge: a tale of the Riots of 'eighty

  • I tell you what though, brother, "said Dennis, cocking his hat for the convenience of scratching his head, and looking gravely at Hugh," it's worthy of notice, as a proof of the amazing equalness and dignity of our law, that it don't make no distinction between men and women.

    Barnaby Rudge

  • I tell you what though, brother,’ said Dennis, cocking his hat for the convenience of scratching his head, and looking gravely at Hugh, ‘it’s worthy of notice, as a proof of the amazing equalness and dignity of our law, that it don’t make no distinction between men and women.

    Barnaby Rudge

  • 'it's worthy of notice, as a proof of the amazing equalness and dignity of our law, that it don't make no distinction between men and women.

    Barnaby Rudge

  • V. i.46 (245,7) that our stars,/Unreconciliable, should divide/Our equalness to this] That is, _should have made us_, in our equality of fortune, disagree _to_ a pitch like this, that one of us must die.

    Notes to Shakespeare, Volume III: The Tragedies

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