Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Having legs of equal length; isosceles.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective rare Having equal legs or sides; isosceles.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Having legs of equal size; isosceles.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin aequicrurus.

Examples

  • For example, does it not require some pains and skill to form the general idea of a triangle, (which is yet none of the most abstract, comprehensive, and difficult,) for it must be neither oblique nor rectangle, neither equilateral, equicrural, nor scalenon; but all and none of these at once.

    An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

  • For example, does it not require some pains and skill to form the general idea of a triangle (which is yet none of the most abstract, comprehensive, and difficult); for it must be neither oblique nor rectangle, neither equilateral, equicrural, nor scalenon, but all and none of these at once?

    A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, by George Berkeley

  • What more easy than for anyone to look a little into his own thoughts, and there try whether he has, or can attain to have, an idea that shall correspond with the description that is here given of the general idea of a triangle, which is "neither oblique nor rectangle, equilateral, equicrural nor scalenon, but all and none of these at once?"

    A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, by George Berkeley

  • And for this reason it is that I conclude that to be true of any obliquangular or scalenon which I had demonstrated of a particular right-angled equicrural triangle, and not because I demonstrated the proposition of the abstract idea of a triangle And here it must be acknowledged that a man may consider a figure merely as triangular, without attending to the particular qualities of the angles, or relations of the sides.

    A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, by George Berkeley

  • Eye unless answered in Pairs, as in the Sides of an equicrural

    Bell's Cathedrals: The Cathedral Church of Saint Paul An Account of the Old and New Buildings with a Short Historical Sketch

  • 'It must be (says he) neither oblique nor rectangular, neither equilateral, equicrural, nor scalenum; but all and none of these at once.

    A Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision

  • For example, does it not require some pains and skill to form the general idea of a triangle (which is yet none of the most abstract, comprehensive, and difficult); for it must be neither oblique nor rectangle, neither equilateral, equicrural, nor scalenon, but ALL AND

    A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge

  • And for this reason it is that I conclude that to be true of any obliquangular or scalenon which I had demonstrated of a particular right -- angled equicrural triangle, and not because I demonstrated the proposition of the abstract idea of a triangle And here it must be acknowledged that a man may consider a figure merely as triangular, without attending to the particular qualities of the angles, or relations of the sides.

    A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge

  • Thus, when I demonstrate any proposition concerning triangles, it is to be supposed that I have in view the universal idea of a triangle; which ought not to be understood as if I could frame an idea of a triangle which was neither equilateral, nor scalenon, nor equicrural; but only that the particular triangle I consider, whether of this or that sort it matters not, doth equally stand for and represent all rectilinear triangles whatsoever, and is in that sense universal.

    A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, by George Berkeley

  • a triangle which was neither equilateral, nor scalenon, nor equicrural; but only that the particular triangle I consider, whether of this or that sort it matters not, doth equally stand for and represent all rectilinear triangles whatsoever, and is in that sense UNIVERSAL.

    A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge

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