Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • transitive verb To counterbalance.
  • transitive verb To give equal balance or weight to.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To be equal in weight; weigh as much as another thing.
  • To weigh as much as in an opposite scale; counterbalance.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To make equal in weight; to counterbalance.
  • intransitive verb To be equal in weight; to weigh as much as another thing.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To counterbalance.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Medieval Latin aequiponderāre, aequiponderāt- : Latin aequi-, equi- + Latin ponderāre, to weigh; see (s)pen- in Indo-European roots.]

Examples

  • Why, you know Tacitus saith, “In rebus bellicis maxime dominalur Fortuna,” which is equiponderate with our vernacular adage, “Luck can maist in the mellee.”

    Waverley

  • Momentarily left to itself amid grounded vehicles and mountains of supplies, the stunned Amplitur struggled to equiponderate its equilibrium.

    The False Mirror

  • Momentarily left to itself amid grounded vehicles and mountains of supplies, the stunned Amplitur struggled to equiponderate its equilibrium.

    The False Mirror

  • ` ` Why, you know, Tacitus saith ` _In rebus bellicis maxime dominatur Fortuna, + which is equiponderate with our vernacular adage, ` Luck can maist in the mellee.

    The Waverley

  • [11] But in this instance, perhaps, distance of space, combined with the unrivalled grandeur of the war, was felt to equiponderate the distance of time, Susa, the Persian capital, being fourteen hundred miles from Athens.

    Note Book of an English Opium-Eater

  • Why, you know Tacitus saith, "In rebus bellicis maxime dominalur Fortuna," which is equiponderate with our vernacular adage, "Luck can maist in the mellee."

    Waverley

  • Why, you know Tacitus saith, "In rebus bellicis maxime dominalur Fortuna," which is equiponderate with our vernacular adage, "Luck can maist in the mellee."

    Waverley — Volume 2

  • Why, you know Tacitus saith, "In rebus bellicis maxime dominalur Fortuna," which is equiponderate with our vernacular adage, "Luck can maist in the mellee."

    Waverley — Complete

  • FORTUNA, "which is equiponderate with our vernacular adage," Luck can maist in the mellee. "

    Waverley: or, 'Tis sixty years since

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