Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Capable of being eradicated

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Capable of being eradicated.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Capable of being eradicated.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. able to be eradicated or rooted out

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A billion people are hungry, hundreds of conflicts and wars are ongoing, tens of millions suffer from eradicable diseases, there is always at least one genocide underway somewhere on the planet, more people still live under dictatorships or oppressive regimes than live in free societies, and arms dealers still make more money than farmers.

    A Conversation with Chris Cleave about Little Bee

  • But once it's initiated, there's a lot of good data that's indicating that the earlier you start therapy, the better off you are from the standpoint of not allowing the virus to form a non-eradicable reservoir, namely such a reservoir that even if you stop therapy after years, the virus is still there, and how you can prevent the really progressive destruction of the immune system, which takes place over years.

    Scientists Say A Gel Can Slow HIV Spread

  • One experiment in the artificial setting of a lab might not be very persuasive on the question of whether racism is eradicable, especially when pitted against real-world evidence of how African-American home buyers are discriminated against by financial institutions, for instance, and dark-skinned criminal defendants are treated more harshly than whites by jurors.

    How Your Brain Looks at Race

  • A billion people are hungry, hundreds of conflicts and wars are ongoing, tens of millions suffer from eradicable diseases, there is always at least one genocide under way somewhere on the planet, more people still live under dictatorships or oppressive regimes than live in free societies, and arms dealers still make more money than farmers.

    Little Bee

  • His race is as in eradicable as the flea-beetle; the last man lives longest.

    Nietzsche's Moral and Political Philosophy

  • Conservatives such as Lorenz von Stein and liberals such as the British utilitarian political economists consider them an in - eradicable feature of modern societies.

    CLASS

  • We deem it advisable, in order to examine the hide properly so-called, to dispense with those eradicable substances which may be regarded, to some extent, as not germain to it, and confine our attention to the raw stock, freed from these imperfections.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 286, June 25, 1881

  • These shores had been washed with a redder stain in years gone by: these people were forever stamped with the eradicable scar of suffering borne by generations dead.

    Defenders of Democracy; contributions from representative men and women of letters and other arts from our allies and our own country, edited by the Gift book committee of the Militia of Mercy

  • The boy Palmerston, to be sure, suffered from a trick -- acquired (Fancy assured them) under workhouse treatment and eradicable by time and gentle handling -- of bursting into tears upon small provocation or none.

    Hocken and Hunken

  • For his spiritual growth had dated from the hour of his enlistment, and that period of life wherein youth absorbs its most vivid and most eradicable impressions, had coincided with the two years he had spent in his new environment.

    Tam o' the Scoots

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