Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adverb Some time ago; heretofore.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Some time ago; a little while before.
  • Former; recent.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adverb Archaic Some time ago; a little while before; heretofore.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adverb Some time ago; beforehand

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • No game in the garths such as erewhile was gotten.

    The Tale of Beowulf Sometime King of the Folk of the Weder Geats

  • O earth! and night erewhile my only day; now may I open my eyes in freedom, for

    Electra

  • I at once became abject and a burden to those who erewhile wished to visit me; and when her father knew it, he took her from me and abjured me and drove me forth without ruth.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • O earth! and night erewhile my only day; now may I open my eyes in freedom, for

    Electra

  • As they went, the knight fell a-talking to Birdalone, and that without any of the covert jeering which he had used erewhile; and he showed her places in the dale, as caverns under the burgs, and little eyots in the stream, and certain stones amongst the

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Now all yeasaid this gladly; and the Green Knight said: It were not so ill done that we should see more of our sister here ere we depart, and hear more of her tale; for meseemeth she began it erewhile but half-way.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • So on the following morning Colonel Chabert went with the erewhile attorney to

    Le Colonel Chabert

  • So on the following morning Colonel Chabert went with the erewhile attorney to

    Le Colonel Chabert

  • And when we departed, the old man followed us down to the strand, and lamented our departure, as he had done with our lords erewhile; only this time yet greater was his lamentation, and needs must we kiss him, each one of us, or never had he been done.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Said Habundia, after she had looked hard on Birdalone a while: Now there is this I find in thee, that though thou callest me wood-mother still, thou art not my daughter as thou wert erewhile, nor I thy mother; and I know not whether to be glad or sorry thereof, since thou art even as much my friend as ever thou wert.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

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