Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of errour.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I am aware of many errours; I know, too, that appearances have often cruelly misrepresented me; my errours you might have the candour to forget, and false appearances I could easily clear in my own favour – but where, and what is the talisman which can erase from my own remembrance that you have thought me unworthy? '

    Camilla

  • When thou hast inflicted upon them the severe pain of harbouring anger against what is so dear to them, wouldst thou load them with regret that they manifested any sensibility of thy errours?

    Camilla

  • I feared even the sight of my dear Uncle himself, lest the sorrows and the errours of a creature he so kindly loved, should have demolished his generous heart! '

    Camilla

  • My errours have all been doubled by concealment – every mischief has been augmented by delay.

    Camilla

  • He attributed not to moral turpitude his errours nor his crimes, but to the prevalence of ill example, and to an unjustifiable and dangerous levity, which irresistibly led him to treat with mockery and trifling the most serious subjects.

    Camilla

  • Were her understanding less good, I should less heavily weigh her errours; but she sets it apart, to abandon herself to her feelings.

    Camilla

  • Whereof it came to passe, that when in processe of tyme they ware encreased to to many for that londe: beyng sent out as it ware, swarme aftre swarme into other habitations and skatered at length into sondrie partes of the worlde (for this banysshed progeny grewe aboue measure) some fel into errours wherout thei could neuer vnsnarle2 themselues.

    The Fardle of Facions, conteining the aunciente maners, customes and lawes, of the peoples enhabiting the two partes of the earth, called Affricke and Asie

  • The miserable falle also of our first parentes, and those extreme errours of mankinde, by the whiche thei ware ledde awaie fro the knowledge and worshippe of one verie GOD: to the wicked supersticion and honour of Idolles and deuelles.

    The Fardle of Facions, conteining the aunciente maners, customes and lawes, of the peoples enhabiting the two partes of the earth, called Affricke and Asie

  • Herculanoes Wives excuse, might now serve to acquite her: but because in blaming others errours, our owne may sometime chance to escape discovery, and cleare us, albeit wee are as guilty; in a sharpe reprehending manner, thus shee began.

    The Decameron

  • Wherein may bee noted, that such men as will reprove those errours in others, which remaine in themselves, commonly are the authors of their owne reprehension

    The Decameron

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