Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Law The right of the state to acquire property by escheat.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The right of succeeding to an escheat.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The right of succeeding to an escheat.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The right of succeeding to an escheat.

Etymologies

escheat +‎ -age (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • "Hast not had word that Jersey has enacted a general act of forfeiture and escheatage 'gainst all Royalists?"

    Janice Meredith

  • "I feared it when I read of the passing of a general act of forfeiture and escheatage," he muttered, "though I still hoped 't would not extend to them."

    Janice Meredith

  • Windows Live English: "A real escheatage for the drafting of user manuals with provision on the Web."

    MSDN Blogs

  • "I have no doubt the rag-tag politicians, if not too busy scheming how to cripple General Washington, will set to on some such piece of folly, for by their persecutions and acts of outlawry and escheatage they have driven into Toryism enough to almost offset the Whigs the British plundering has made.

    Janice Meredith

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