Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of the genus Eupatorium of perennial herbs.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From the genus name.

Examples

  • Pinch out asters, helenium and eupatorium at knee height and they will re-branch to provide you with stockier plants.

    Jobs to do in May

  • Lovely August blooms – I love the picture of eupatorium and butterfly, so airy – almost fairy.

    August Playbook-GBBD « Fairegarden

  • But the Joe-Pye Weed, eupatorium purpureum unfurling its foliage in a spiral pattern caught the eye.

    Green Leaf Day « Fairegarden

  • Do you have the wild ageratum, used to be a eupatorium of some sort?

    August Clues « Fairegarden

  • I see frost here everywhere, and eupatorium, morning glories, coreopsis, butterfly bushes–well, ALL of it looks very limp and shriveled just overnight.

    Look Out Of Any Window « Fairegarden

  • Shown above are the peach tree with some of his friends, perilla frutescens, eupatorium rugosum ‘Chocolate’ and sedum ‘Black Jack’.

    Color in the Garden-GBDW Part Two « Fairegarden

  • I removed the eupatorium and moved a few strands of helopsis into its spot, which shows as a big blank spot over on the right side of the garden in the second picture.

    Note to self

  • Digitalis, sarsaparilla, eupatorium, she had chosen, for the health of the body; a fern leaf for grace and beauty; the oak and the elm for peace and the civic virtues; evergreen, pine, and hemlock for the aspiring life of the mind and the eternity of thought; rosemary for remembrance, and pansies for thoughts.

    The Story of Wellesley

  • About her bending figure grew what seemed to Bart's half-dazzled sense the flowers of paradise, for wild sunflowers and sheafs of purple eupatorium brushed her arms, standing in high phalanx by the edge of the creek.

    The Zeit-Geist

  • One of the giants is purple eupatorium, which sometimes carries its corymbs of flesh-colored flowers ten and twelve feet high.

    The Writings of John Burroughs — Volume 05: Pepacton

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