Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. That denotes an event

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Falling back on my recent insights on how Anatolian-Tocharian emerged out of my model note too my later relabelling of "eventive" as "progressive" in this model, I realize one interesting motivation for a conjectural loss of this participle.

    Archive 2009-09-01

  • Surely experientials ie. later sigmatic aorists would belong in the "objective eventive" despite being unmarked by continuous *-i.

    More on a PIE subjective-objective model

  • New thought: A 2D matrix of eventive/non-eventive ...

    The PIE *to-participle in my subjective-objective model

  • My previous description of my model was very tedious, I have to admit, but I think I can now sum my model up more concisely as a conjugation model that takes into account the definiteness of object (subjective vs. objective) and the definiteness of event (eventive vs. non-eventive).

    More on a PIE subjective-objective model

  • It's the difference between "I ate the baby (last night)" (eventive) and "I eat babies (in general)" (non-eventive).

    Archive 2009-09-01

  • I think I've come to an interesting idea that takes a page from the Ancient Egyptian verbal system: eventive versus non-eventive.

    Archive 2009-09-01

  • However, the antecedent of sigmatic aorists ie. those verbs marked in *-s- with lengthened root vowel which originally expressed a past experience were by definition eventive as well.

    Archive 2009-09-01

  • New thought: A 2D matrix of eventive/non-eventive and subjective/objective

    Archive 2009-09-01

  • By drawing a two-dimensional grid between eventive & non-eventive on the one hand and subjective & objective on the other, we end up with four main categories in which to place the earliest verbs of Common Proto-IE.

    Archive 2009-09-01

  • An eventive verb, as the name implies, refers to a specific event in time while the non-eventive by contrast focuses more on the action or state in a more generalized context.

    Archive 2009-09-01

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