Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found. Check out and contribute to the discussion of this word!

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And also such another chariot with such hosts ordained and arrayed go with the empress upon another side, everych by himself, with four hosts, right as the emperor did; but not with so great multitude of people.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And above the chief tower of the palace be two round pommels of gold, and in everych of them be two carbuncles great and large, that shine full bright upon the night.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And in everych of these isles is a king crowned; and all be obeissant to that king.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And when he felt well that he should die, he said to his twelve sons, that everych of them should bring him one of his arrows.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And then everych of his friends take a quantity of the ashes, and keep them instead of relics, and say that it is holy thing.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And when the philosophers have done and performed their commandments, then the minstrels begin to do their minstrelsy, everych in their instruments, each after other, with all the melody that they can devise.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And then he answereth, If ye will that I reign over you as lord, do everych of you that I shall command him, either to abide or to go; and whomsoever that I command to be slain, that anon he be slain.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And whan his folk saughe him at the erthe, thei weren alle abasscht, and wenden he had ben ded, and flowen everych one; and hire enemyes aftre, and chaced hem: but thei wiste not, that the emperour was there.

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And of everych of these sins it behoveth them to be shriven of their priests, and to pay great sum of silver for their penance.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And then he bade the youngest son dissever every one from other, and break everych by himself.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.