Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who, or that which, exacerbates or makes worse.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Furthermore, in each of these cycles, once carbon dioxide starts to rise, if it had playing a significant role as an exacerbator we would expect to see the rate of temperature change increase as the effect of CO2 as an exacerbator is added to that of whatever is the primary driver.

    "Let's just say that global warming deniers are now on a par with Holocaust deniers...."

  • So, in earlier warming phases, rising temperatures of whatever cause have caused an increase in CO2 concentration outgassing from oceans, as I suggested in my reply to GarageMahal here, is a theory that would seem to fit the data, which might have played a statistically minor role as an exacerbator.

    "Let's just say that global warming deniers are now on a par with Holocaust deniers...."

  • And by "driving climate change," I mean at least "has an effect that is statistically significant," not merely that it theoretically plays a de minimis role as an exacerbator.

    "I'm not doin' hand shows today."

  • And in any event, I had thought that the Algore thesis was that CO2 was responsible for global warming, not that it was a mere contributor or exacerbator, or that "once the CO2 gets going it contributes to driving the temperature farther up."

    "Crisis = opportunity + danger."

  • Whole milk powder prices scaled the lofty heights of $US5000 a metric tonne a record since measuring began, and Fonterra has argued that its auction platform is merely a reflection of the market downturn, rather than an instigator or exacerbator as critics have claimed.

    National Business Review (NBR) New Zealand

  • "Our results are inconsistent with a causal role for MMR vaccine as a trigger or exacerbator of either GI difficulties or autism," states Mady Hornig, associate professor of Epidemiology and director of translational research in the Center for Infection and Immunity in the Mailman School, and co-corresponding author of the study.

    Later On

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