Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of exceed.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

exceed + -eth

Examples

  • Yea, this is no saying of mine, but a word of wisdom, "Naught in might exceedeth dread necessity."

    Helen

  • Were it not that distress with me exceedeth the bounds of restraint, that which thy servant hath forced herself to do in writing this writ were an aidance to her, despite her despair of thee, because of her knowledge of thee that thou wilt fail to answer.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • “Verily, he hath obeyed handsomely, but he exceedeth in his praise of the woman.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • The popular saying is, “The entertainment of a guest is three days; the viaticum (jáizah) is a day and a night, and whatso exceedeth this is alms.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • He who exceedeth in contention sinneth, and he who against upright standeth not on ward, is not safe from the sword.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • As you are undoubtedly aware, Sen. Obama's warchest exceedeth that of Sen. Clinton.

    Controlling the Myth

  • And contrarily, when the evil exceedeth the good, the whole is apparent or seeming evil: so that he who hath by experience, or reason, the greatest and surest prospect of consequences, deliberates best himself; and is able, when he will, to give the best counsel unto others.

    Leviathan

  • The number of the dead long exceedeth all that shall live.

    Hydriotaphia, or Urn-burial

  • “Nay but, rogue,” said the Black Knight, “this exceedeth thy license — Beware ye tamper not with my patience.”

    Ivanhoe

  • Reniero, thy revenge exceedeth al manhoode and respect: For, if thou wast almost frozen in my Court, thou hast roasted me all day long on this Tower, yea, meerly broyled my poore naked bodie, beside starving mee thorough want of Food and drinke.

    The Decameron

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