Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Archaic form of eccentricity.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Same as eccentricity.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Hitherto, since Ptolemy had given no reason for this assumption, Kepler had preferred not to make it, only taking for granted that the centre was at some point on the line called the excentricity (see Figs. 1, 2).

    Kepler

  • Without this actual measurement we might have thought that the excentricity was the effect of the projection of the circles on the apparent concavity of the sky.

    Personal Narrative of Travels to the Equinoctial Regions of America, During the Year 1799-1804 — Volume 1

  • "excentricity" because the foci (not the centre) of an ellipse are regarded as the representatives of the centre of a circle.

    Pioneers of Science

  • Between the Miocene and the Pleistocene periods geographical changes occurred which rendered a true glacial period possible with high excentricity.

    Alfred Russel Wallace: Letters and Reminiscences, Vol. 1

  • When the high excentricity passed away the glacial epoch also passed away in the Temperate zone; but it persists in the

    Alfred Russel Wallace: Letters and Reminiscences, Vol. 1

  • The pith of the tree felled was excentric, the greater development taking place as usual on the southern side; it was two and a half inches N., three and a half S.; but about 10 feet above the base this excentricity was nearly doubled.

    Journals of Travels in Assam, Burma, Bhootan, Afghanistan and the Neighbouring Countries

  • Kepler found velocities at P and Q proportional not to AP and AQ but to AQ and AP, or to EP and EQ if EC = CA (bisection of the excentricity).

    Kepler

  • He found it best to assume the centre of distance half-way between the centre of the earth and the excentric, thus “bisecting the excentricity”.

    Kepler

  • Before making a fresh start he looked for some simplification of the labour; and determined to adopt Ptolemy's assumption known as the principle of the bisection of the excentricity.

    Kepler

  • When the high excentricity passed away the glacial epoch also passed away in the Temperate zone; but it persists in the Arctic zone, where during the Miocene there were mild climates, and this is due to the persistence of the changed geographical conditions.

    Alfred Russel Wallace Letters and Reminiscences

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