Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Apt to take exception, or to object; captious.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Disposed or apt to take exceptions, or to object; captious.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Disposed to take exception or make objection; inclined to object or cavil; captious.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • However, I was too glad of his arrival to be exceptious; and the whole party were speedily embarked in the ferry, taking their turn as the first arrived at the spot, which we twain abided, watching the punt across the stream, which, in consequence of the strength of the current, it was indispensable to float down some hundred yards, in order to reach the opposite shore.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 56, No. 345, July, 1844

  • No man is valianter than he is in civil company, and where he thinks no danger may come on it, and is the readiest man to fall upon a drawer and those that must not strike again: wonderful exceptious and cholerick where he sees men are loth to give him occasion, and you cannot pacify him better than by quarrelling with him.

    Microcosmography or, a Piece of the World Discovered; in Essays and Characters

  • It is his ancestor, the original pensioner, that has laid up this inexhaustible fund of merit, which makes his Grace so very delicate and exceptious about the merit of all other grantees of the Crown.

    Paras. 40-59

  • It is his ancestor, the original pensioner, that has laid up this inexhaustible fund of merit, which makes his Grace so very delicate and exceptious about the merit of all other grantees of the crown.

    The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. IV (of X)—Great Britain and Ireland II

  • In truth, the texture of that salmon-coloured skin could be seen to be aristocratic without a microscope, and the exceptious artizan has an offhand way when contrasts are made painfully strong by an idler of this kind coming, gloved and brushed, into the very den where he is sweating and muddling in his shirt-sleeves.

    The Hand of Ethelberta

  • His character was open, his disposition frank, his mind richly cultivated, and his conversation unreserved, without being exceptious as to those with whom he might be conversing.

    Memoirs To Illustrate The History Of My Time Volume 1

  • And lastly, how shall many seeming clashings and dark pas sages in sacred history and chronology be placed in such a light, as may throughly satisfy, or at least effectually silence the doubtful and exceptious?

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. III.

  • It is his ancestor, the original pensioner, that has laid up this inexhaustible fund of merit which makes his Grace so very delicate and exceptious about the merit of all other grantees of the crown.

    The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. 05 (of 12)

  • The examples of the saints, though they will not make a bad action good, yet will help to free a good action from the blame of exceptious people.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume V (Matthew to John)

  • Tho 'he is a little fanta - stical, loves to hear himfelf talk, and is fomewhat felf - fufficient; you muft: confider Jie is young, has been a* broad, and keeps good company: - The trade will foon be at an end, if young ladies and gentlemen grow over nice and exceptious.

    A Collection of the Most Esteemed Farces and Entertainments Performed on the British Stage ...

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