Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The act of flaying; the operation of stripping off the skin.
  • noun Hence The act or process of abrading or galling; especially, a breaking or removal of the outer layers of the skin.
  • noun An abraded, galled, or broken surface of the skin.
  • noun . The act of stripping of possessions; spoliation; robbery.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of excoriating or flaying, or state of being excoriated, or stripped of the skin; abrasion.
  • noun obsolete Stripping of possession; spoliation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The act of excoriating or flaying
  • noun The excoriated place or the state of being excoriated, or stripped of the skin; abrasion.
  • noun Severe verbal denouncing

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun severe censure
  • noun an abraded area where the skin is torn or worn off

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

See "excoriate"

Examples

  • They will also suffer excoriation from the Repugs, who will say, "See, we knew your bill wouldn't make anything better," when in actuality, it will be the bill the Repugs wanted, i.e., the one without a public option.

    Public option pullback?

  • In the next issue of my magazine, National Review, I published a 5,000-word excoriation of Welch:

    Goldwater, the John Birch Society and Me

  • Only twelve years ago I wrote about “one of those little episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates the nature of alliances,” and in came that little blue note from Buckley expressing dismay with his customary one-word excoriation.

    No Uncertain Terms

  • Only twelve years ago I wrote about “one of those little episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates the nature of alliances,” and in came that little blue note from Buckley expressing dismay with his customary one-word excoriation.

    No Uncertain Terms

  • Only twelve years ago I wrote about “one of those little episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates the nature of alliances,” and in came that little blue note from Buckley expressing dismay with his customary one-word excoriation.

    No Uncertain Terms

  • Only twelve years ago I wrote about “one of those little episodes in the relations between nations that illustrates the nature of alliances,” and in came that little blue note from Buckley expressing dismay with his customary one-word excoriation.

    No Uncertain Terms

  • “I have had several letters,” he wrote to Professor Edwin Mims, of Trinity College, North Carolina, “about an 'excoriation' (Great Heavens!

    The Life and Letters of Walter H Page

  • Since he's telling the truth I expect a full excoriation treatment from the Limbaugh/Hannity wing and their mouthpiece Michael Steele.

    Voinovich: The GOP's 'being taken over by Southerners'

  • Bush 43 was on the receiving end of eight years of lies, insults, and verbal excoriation delivered by the MSM.

    President Obama concedes loss of House in 2010. | RedState

  • Nichol launched into a passionate excoriation of the Republican social agenda that targets: gays; women; students; middle class families; teachers; professors and Medicaid recipients while, "denying thousands of others the right to vote."

    Michael Carmichael: Battleground North Carolina: Democratic Women Fired Up!

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