Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Second-person singular simple present form of express

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

express + -est

Examples

  • As to the admiration thou expressest for the books of scripture, thou art certainly right in it.

    Clarissa Harlowe

  • The sun shall not enter into the constellation of Aries seven times more, before thou shalt have still better cause for the good opinion thou expressest of Valdimagra, in the kind reception thou shalt there meet with.

    Purgatory. Canto VIII

  • I cannot be too thankful for the change thou expressest in thy feelings with regard to the Anti-Slavery Society, and feel no desire at all to blame thee for former opposition, believing, as I do, that it was permitted in order to drive me closer to my Saviour, and into a deeper examination of the ground upon which I was standing.

    The Grimke Sisters

  • I begin to pity thee heartily, now I see thee in earnest in the fruitless love thou expressest to this angel of a woman; and the rather, as, say what thou wilt, it is impossible she should get over her illness, and her friends 'implacableness, of which she has had fresh instances.

    Clarissa Harlowe; or the history of a young lady — Volume 7

  • "My own son after the common faith, that faith which is common to all the regenerate, and which thou hast in truth, and expressest to the life."

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume VI (Acts to Revelation)

  • I begin to pity thee heartily, now I see thee in earnest in the fruitless love thou expressest to this angel of a woman; and the rather, as, say what thou wilt, it is impossible she should get over her illness, and her friends’ implacableness, of which she has had fresh instances.

    Clarissa Harlowe

  • And the more reason thou hast to love Sophronia, so much the more unjustly dost thou complain of fortune (albeit thou expressest this not in so many words) in that it hath awarded her to me, it seeming to thee that thy love for her had been honourable, were she other than mine; but tell me, if thou be as well advised as thou usest to be, to whom could fortune have awarded her, whereof thou shouldst have more cause to render it thanks, than of having awarded her to me?

    The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio

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