Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A little island, especially in a river or lake.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A little island in a river or lake. See ait.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as ait.

Etymologies

From Middle English eyt, eit, from Old English īġeoþ, īgoþ, iggaþ, iggoþ ("ait, eyot, islet, small island"), diminutive of īġ, ēġ, īeġ ("island") which constitutes the first element of island. See also ait. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The reach opposite and including the eyot is the sole piece of the natural

    The Naturalist on the Thames

  • For the eyot indeed she loved, and deemed it her own, since never had her evil dream, the witch, set foot thereon.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • And it was a windless dawn after a hot night, and a light mist lay upon the face of the water, and above it rose the greenery of the eyot.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Scarce had she time to wonder if the boat would obey her spell ere it began to stir beneath her, and then glided out into the lake and took its way over the summer ripple, going betwixt Green Eyot and the mainland, as if to weather the western ness of the eyot: and it went not a stonecast from the shore of the said mainland.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Then, whereas the day was very calm and fair, and the dame had given her holiday, she wandered about the eyot, and most in a little wood of berry-trees, as quicken and whitebeam and dog-wood, and sported with the birds, who feared her not, but came and sat on her shoulders, and crept about her feet.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Soon she had covered up the house from her, for on that eastern end, both a tongue of the woodland shoved out west into the meadow, and, withal, the whole body of the wood there drew down to the water, and presently cut off all the greensward save a narrow strip along by the lake, off the narrowest whereof lay the rocky eyot aforesaid, nigher unto the shore than lay Green Eyot.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • She pushed off into the deep and swam strongly through the still water, and the sun rose while she was on the way, and by then she had laid a hand on the willow-twigs of the eyot, was sending a long beam across the waters; and her wet shoulders rose up into the path of it and were turned into ruddy gold.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Now she took the water, and rowed strongly with her lovely limbs till she came to the eyot, and there she went aland, and visited every place which had been kind to her; and kissed the trees and flowers that had solaced her, and once more drew the birds and rabbits to sport with her; till suddenly it came into her head that the time was wearing overfast.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Then she turned inward to the eyot, which had done her nought but good, and which she loved; and she unbound her hair, and let it fall till the ends of the tresses mingled with the heads of the meadow-sweet, and thereafter walked quietly up into the grassy middle of the isle.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • At last she arose, and when she had plucked and eaten some handfuls of the strawberries which grew plenteously on the sweet ground of the eyot, she went down to the landward-looking shore, and took the water, and swam slowly across the warm ripple till she came once more to the strand and her raiment.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

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