Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of fabler.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They are no longer journalists; they are now promoters and fablers.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » L.A. Times Coverage of Second Amendment Incorporation Decisions:

  • Eumæus has an open single-hearted piety; he cannot play a disguise, he hates it for he has been deceived by it when assumed by lying fablers.

    Homer's Odyssey A Commentary

  • No wonder that the Mythology, and Arabian Nights, and Shakespeare, and Scott's novels entertain us, -- we are poets and fablers and dramatists and novelists ourselves.

    A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

  • It is the utmost stretch of human concession, to grant thought and language to living things; -- birds, beasts, and fishes; rights which the old fablers have rendered inalienable, as vehicles of instruction; but here, as I should think, the liberty ends.

    Reminiscences of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Robert Southey

  • Whiche opinion stucke in the myndes of men not manye yeares sithence, by meanes of certain fine fablers and lowd lyers, such as were the Authors of King Arthure the great and such like, who tell many an vnlawfull leasing of the Ladyes of the Lake, that is, the Nymphes.

    Shepheardes Calendar

  • These fablers say that Adam, who had refrained from the bed of his wife from the murder of Abel to that time, again lived with her as man and wife, in order that he might not by his example induce others to maintain perpetual continence, and thus prevent mankind from being multiplied.

    Commentary on Genesis, Vol. II Luther on Sin and the Flood

  • The fancies of our modern bards are not only more gallant, but, on a change of the scene, more sublime, more terrible, more alarming, than those of the classic fablers. —

    The Expedition of Gradasso: A Metrical Romance. Selected from the Orlando ...

  • From a very few rude and fimple tenets originally, thofe wild fablers called fcalds or poets had, in the courfe of eight or nine centuries, invented and raifed an amazing ftrutlure of fi9: ion* We muft x\u not, therefore, fuppofc that aH the fables of the Edda were equally known to the Gothic nations of every age or tribe.

    Icelandic poetry

  • It was a tradition invented by the old fablers that giants brought the stones of Stonehenge from the most sequestered deserts of Africa, and placed them in Ireland; that every stone was washed with juices of herbs, and contained a medical power; and that Merlin, the magician, at the request of King Arthur, transported them from Ireland, and erected them in circles on the plain of Amesbury, as a sepulchral monument for the Britons treacherously slain by Hengist.

    Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete

  • It is the utmost stretch of human concession, to grant thought and language to living things; ” birds, beasts, and fishes; rights which the old fablers have rendered inalienable, as vehicles of instruction; but here, as I should think, the liberty ends.

    Reminiscences of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Robert Southey

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.