Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of faculty.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Being awake and conscious tends to be associated with having your faculties about you, where the word faculties effectively means your ability to think coherently, to reason things out.

    BREAKFAST WITH SOCRATES

  • Being awake and conscious tends to be associated with having your faculties about you, where the word faculties effectively means your ability to think coherently, to reason things out.

    BREAKFAST WITH SOCRATES

  • For Kant, "the suprasensible destination of all our faculties is the pre-destination of a moral being."

    Rhyming Sensation in 'Mont Blanc'

  • Intelligence, reason, conscience, what we call the faculties of the soul, are of modern date.

    Part III, Chapter VI of "Uranie"

  • Different credit systems in faculties and the apparently "typical" situation of (life-long) professors who act irresponsibly towards their students.

    Protest! Violence! Chaos!

  • In his analysis of the Critique of Judgment, Deleuze argues that for Kant, the "free accord of the faculties" is discordantly harmonious because it is already determined by reason's legislative role in the moral sphere.

    Rhyming Sensation in 'Mont Blanc'

  • Tenure in law faculties is interrelated with other social sciences, and provides one of the treasures which informs government and politics, as well as training youth.

    Balkinization

  • Inasmuch as the virtual beauty of "harmony" and "proportion" said to prevail between the intellect's discrete faculties is to prove vocal, audible, and lasting, the reflexive operation of critical writing is at least one way of producing that outcome.

    The Voice of Critique: Aesthetic Cognition After Kant,

  • First, he argues that the condition of possibility for any determinate, legislative relationships between faculties is that these faculties are capable of a free and indeterminate — that is,

    The Transcendental: Deleuze, P. B. Shelley, and the Freedom of Immobility

  • NONE of us has lived long without discovering that everything he has he pays for; that every gain has a corresponding loss; that a development even of one of our own faculties, is at the expense of the others.

    Purple Springs

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