Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Alternative spelling of fairy-tale.
  • noun Alternative spelling of fairy tale.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I should reply, _Read Undine: that is a fairytale; then read this and that as well, and you will see what is a fairytale_.

    A Dish of Orts : Chiefly Papers on the Imagination, and on Shakespeare

  • I think you only have to look at the plethora of successful texts on the market which base themselves around fairytales – not just books, but movies like Sydney White and Ever After also – and you can see that basing a story around a fairytale is a great formula, and one that the audience loves.

    Writer Unboxed » Blog Archive » From the Mailbox: Fairytale as a basis for fantasy

  • Her husband froze a few minutes later as he watched her tower crumble on TV, ending what he called a fairytale marriage in an American dream.

    The Seattle Times

  • Her husband froze a few minutes later as he watched her tower crumble on TV, ending what he called a fairytale marriage in an American dream.

    Breaking News: CBS News

  • Clearly you're right - the popular understanding of fairytale is something with a "happily ever after".

    Pony Positive Day Two

  • While that's historically true, the definition of "fairytale ending" has irrevocably changed because of Disney since fairytale is no longer synonymous with "cautionary tale."

    Pony Positive Day Two

  • Located in the Vendée, it is the definition of fairytale, with "floating" towers on the corners of the chateau and flamboyant interiors featuring unicorn taxidermy and chandeliers.

    Nouveau riches: what's new in France

  • Going from light to dark and all shades in between, managing all emotions from love to hatred, joy to sorrow, dread to excitement, fairytale is humble yet powerful, full of meaning yet full of adventure.

    Writer Unboxed » Blog Archive » From the Mailbox: Fairytale as a basis for fantasy

  • My best friend with Joan of Arc hair and violet eyes was summoned to bed by the man I wanted as we were sitting at the foot of the stairs, talking of immortality and oranges and a certain fairytale fox.

    A Scattering of Rivals

  • First out of the gate is “Goosegirl” by Margaret Ronald, which offers up a new look at the German fairytale from the Brothers Grimm.

    Not #40, alas

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