Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Resembling a fan in shape or form; flabellate.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective shaped in the form of a fan

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He sticks a few fan-shaped slices into a pot of water, covers them with parchment, then promptly forgets about them.

    The Sorcerer’s Apprentices

  • He sticks a few fan-shaped slices into a pot of water, covers them with parchment, then promptly forgets about them.

    The Sorcerer’s Apprentices

  • Condo's chipmunk-faced characters - marked by their bulbous cheeks, fan-shaped ears and toothy grins - all have some Warner Bros. to them; though the difference between "The Water Nymph" and "The Cracked Cardinal," both painted in 2004, is the difference between looking at a Rembrandt and a Velazquez.

    A 'dark, twisted fantasy' revealed

  • Orient Express Orient-Express's Governor's Residence is a 48-room teak house where guests can lounge along its fan-shaped outdoor pool.

    Traveling in Yangon

  • She placed this affair on a silver patterned tray with a razor-thin, fan-shaped spatula.

    Five Stops on Line 2, Ch 1: Qalb elouz

  • According to Joyce Ruijgrok, the company's marketing and sales manager, best-selling items are decorative plates with Dutch landscapes (hand-painted examples start at $117) and a traditional fan-shaped five-stem tulip vase (from $392).

    Delight in Blue and White

  • Cigar lovers can watch stogies being cut and rolled with a chaveta (a fan-shaped knife) and cortadora (cutter) at the third-generation Cuba Tobacco Cigar Co.

    Take Monday Off: Cuban Miami

  • She placed this affair on a silver patterned tray with a razor-thin, fan-shaped spatula.

    Five Stops on Line 2, Ch 1: Qalb elouz

  • They smote the poppy field beneath my windows, spread out fan-shaped six wide, picking with both hands, and ripped a swath of destruction through the very heart of the field.

    The Golden Poppy

  • Instead, they work and sleep on Dejima, a fan-shaped, man-made island, surrounded by a high wall and connected to Nagasaki by a heavily guarded bridge.

    Book review of "The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet," a novel by David Mitchell

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