Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of six sesquiterpenes, one of which is responsible for the green colour of apples.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Emeryville, Calif.-based company has contracted with Biomin do BrasilNiutrciao to use its facilities to manufacture a chemical called farnesene, which is used for cosmetic products and lubricants.

    CNET News.com

  • Amyris Inc., a California company, is installing fermenters at a Tate and Lyle corn processing plant in Decatur, Ill., to turn corn sugar into a chemical called farnesene.

    Battle brewing over biofuels' future

  • Emeryville, Calif. -based Amyris Inc. uses engineered yeast to convert sugar into a molecule called farnesene that can be used as a diesel substitute.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • In Brazil, Amyris will make farnesene from cane sugar, the same feedstock now used there for making fuel ethanol.

    Battle brewing over biofuels' future

  • Amyris operates a small farnesene production plant in Sao Paulo state and is building facilities at mills owned by

  • Amyris plans to produce as much as 50 million liters 13.2 million gallons of farnesene next year from facilities around the world, he said.

  • The venture will start producing farnesene, a chemical that can be transformed into fuel, in 2014, Emeryville, California- based Amyris said today in a statement.

  • Selling farnesene, Amyris's 15-carbon specialty chemical that can also be transformed into lubricants, would protect revenue further.

  • Amyris will either sell farnesene, which it sells under the brand name Biofene, or it will treat the chemicals slightly and sell them for specific applications, such as lubricants.

    CNET News.com

  • In the study, aphids reared continuously on genetically engineered Arabidopsis thaliana plants that produced beta-farnesene became habituated to the pheromone within three generations and no longer responded to the compound, even though they still produced it.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

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