Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Characterized by fatuity; foolish; fatuous.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Stupid; fatuous.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective stupid; fatuous

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • SIMMONS: But it is fortuitous and fatuitous that it came out at the right time.

    CNN Transcript Mar 5, 2008

  • Entering into its emptiness, frivolity, and falsehood, with a spirit inspired by scorn and impatience, I took my revenge on this “fat,” by making him as fatuitous as I possibly could.

    Villette

  • Now that the race of man had lost in fact all distinction of rank, this pride was doubly fatuitous; now that we felt a kindred, fraternal nature with all who bore the stamp of humanity, this angry reminiscence of times for ever gone, was worse than foolish.

    The Last Man

  • On such theistic principles all sin must be simply defect, and all defect must be absolutely fatuitous. '

    Beulah

  • Certainly the present attempts to discover that law, however fatuitous they may seem to many, are neither illogical, nor, judging by the impetus already given to biology, or the science of life, labor altogether spent in vain.

    Our Common Insects A Popular Account of the Insects of Our Fields, Forests, Gardens and Houses

  • The coincidences of prophecy are not more remarkable than those of star-telling; and Dryden and the author I have referred to were probably both captivated into belief by some fatuitous realization of their horoscopic predictions.

    The Wits and Beaux of Society Volume 1

  • Entering into its emptiness, frivolity, and falsehood, with a spirit inspired by scorn and impatience, I took my revenge on this "fat," by making him as fatuitous as I possibly could.

    Villette

  • Neither did she shed a single tear, but the vacant light of her eyes had stamped a fatuitous expression on her features that was melancholy and heartbreaking beyond all power of language to describe.

    Willy Reilly The Works of William Carleton, Volume One

  • Now that the race of man had lost in fact all distinction of rank, this pride was doubly fatuitous; now that we felt a kindred, fraternal nature with all who bore the stamp of humanity, this angry reminiscence of times for ever gone, was worse than foolish.

    II.8

  • Now that the race of man had lost in fact all distinction of rank, this pride was doubly fatuitous; now that we felt a kindred, fraternal nature with all who bore the stamp of humanity, this angry reminiscence of times for ever gone, was worse than foolish.

    The Last Man

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