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Examples

  • _A more particular declaration of the metricall feete of the ancient Poets

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • Their Grammarians made a great multitude of feete, I wot not to what huge number, and of so many sizes as their wordes were of length, namely sixe sizes, whereas indeede, the metricall feete are but twelve in number, wherof foure only be of two times, and eight of three times, the rest compounds of the premised two sorts, even as the Arithmeticall numbers aboue three are made of two and three.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • A more particular declaration of the metricall feete of the auncient Poets Greeke and Latine and chiefly of the feete of two times.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • I wot not to what huge number, and of so many sizes and their wordes were of length, namely sixe sizes, whereas in deede, the metricall feete are but twelue in number, whereof foure only be of two times, and eight of three times, the rest compounds of the premised two sorts, euen as the Arithmeticall numbers aboue three are made of two and three.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • Well, the helicopters and the plane was just about 50 feete meters from us, so we could see the expressions on the 15 faces as they were walked in front of the cameras, stopping for just a moment to allow some of the photographers to get good some shots for tomorrow's newspapers, and then escorted on to the helicopters.

    CNN Transcript Apr 5, 2007

  • The exercise of both was shootyng and darting, running and wrestling, and trying such maisteries, as eyther consisted in swiftnesse of feete, agilitie of body, strength of armes, or Martiall discipline.

    The More Things Change II

  • Pasimonda, with an huge long Staffe in his hand, to hinder their passage downe the stayres; but Chynon saluted him so soundly on the head, that it being cleft in twaine, he fell dead before his feete.

    The Decameron

  • So laying hands uppon him, they threw him against the ground, having him by the haire on his head, and tearing the garments from his backe, spurning him with their feete, and beating him with their fists, that many were much ashamed to see it.

    The Decameron

  • Having thus spoken, he prepared his entrance to the tomb in such order, that he thrust in his feete before, for his easier descending downe into it.

    The Decameron

  • Catching fast hold on my Hood, against the ground he threw me rudely, trampling on me with his feete, and beating me with so many cruell blowes, that I thought my body to be broken in peeces.

    The Decameron

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