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Examples

  • Presuming thus still on this secret felicitie, and fearing no disaster to befall her: it chaunced (on a night) that the yong Gentleman being entred into the

    The Decameron

  • At the Princes affable motion, shee sate downe betweene them, their delight being beyond expression, to behold her, but abridged of much more felicitie, because they understood not any part of her

    The Decameron

  • Grant then you greatest Gods (if you be the Patrones of this mine unexpected felicitie) that with honor and due respect, I may hereafter make apparantly knowne: how highly I acknowledge this thy wonderfull favour, in being more mercifull to me, then I could be to my selfe.

    The Decameron

  • Your wisedome gave her to one who not onely loved her not, but also one that had no desire to know her: Gisippus gave her unto him, who, above all felicitie else, yea, more than his owne life, both entirely loved and desired her.

    The Decameron

  • The Histories make further mention, that there they lived (a long while after) in much felicitie, with thankfull hearts (no doubt) in Heaven, in acknowledgement of so many great mercies received.

    The Decameron

  • Iohn Mandeuil Knight, borne in the towne of S. Albons, was so well giuen to the studie of learning from his childhood, that he seemed to plant a good part of his felicitie in the same: for he supposed that the honour of his birth would nothing auaile him, except he could render the same more honourable by his knowledge in good letters.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • Thames, from London to Grauesend, where the same Ambassadour with his traine and furniture was imbarked towards his voyage homeward, which God prosper in all felicitie.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • Realmes on either part, and to the priuate desired hope; and certeine felicitie of all our subiects.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • Thare concurred togitther Achab and his false prophettis; thare war gratulationis and clappin of handis; thare war promisses of diligence, closenes, and felicitie.

    The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6)

  • First, That the felicitie of Godis people may not be measured by any externall appeirance; for oftyn it is, that the same people, to whome

    The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6)

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