fellow-commoners love

fellow-commoners

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of fellow-commoner.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Here it is evident that his health was under no peril from too severe a course of study, since he expressly informs us that "it was not the fashion in those days to plague fellow-commoners with lectures."

    Maria Edgeworth

  • He announced to his fellow-commoners that his right honourable friend and colleague Lord de Terrier had thought it right to retire from the Treasury.

    Phineas Finn

  • By the door on either side are the red-curtained and velvet-cushioned seats of the Master and Vice-master, beyond whom sit the noblemen and fellow-commoners.

    Julian Home

  • It was one of the regular, reckless, uproarious affairs -- D'Acres, Boodle, Tulk, Brogten, Fitzurse, were all there, and the elite of the fast fellow-commoners, and sporting men besides.

    Julian Home

  • He attacks the snobbishness of the universities, showing us how one class of young men consists of fellow-commoners, who wear lace and drink wine with their meals, and another class consists of sizars, or servitors, who wear badges, as being poor, and are never allowed to take their food with their fellow-students.

    Thackeray

  • He announced to his fellow-commoners that his right honourable friend and colleague Lord de Terrier had thought it right to retire from the

    Phineas Finn The Irish Member

  • The fellow-commoners are 'young men of fortune,' who, in consideration of paying twice as much for everything as anybody else, are allowed the privilege of sitting at the fellows 'table in hall, and in their seats at chapel; of wearing a gown with gold or silver lace, and a velvet cap with a metallic tassel; and of getting off with a less number of

    Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 440 Volume 17, New Series, June 5, 1852

  • I had such strength, health, and spirits, that I had more life in my little finger than half the fellow-commoners -- genteel, spindle-shanked striplings, who might have passed for a collection of my grandfather's walking-canes -- bad in their whole bodies.

    Night and Morning, Volume 3

  • And, though the very reverse of an ambitious or calculating man, he had certainly nourished the belief that some one of the "hats" or "tinsel gowns" -- i.e., young lords or fellow-commoners, with whom he was on such excellent terms, and who supped with him so often, would do something for him in the way of a living.

    Night and Morning, Complete

  • Now they might fare as they fared, and therefore might eat with them, and be fellow-commoners with them.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume VI (Acts to Revelation)

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