Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Female nature; feminality.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It was true that the sense of wrong did not break forth audibly; for, though susceptible, Isabel was meek, and her pride was concealed by the outward softness and feminacy of her temper: but she stole away from those who had wounded her heart or trampled upon its feelings, and nourished with secret but passionate tears the memory of the harshness or injustice she had endured.

    The Disowned — Complete

  • In a word, the face and the figure were not in harmony: the figure prevented you from pronouncing her to be masculine; the face took from the figure the charm of feminacy.

    Lucretia — Complete

  • Educated even to learning -- courageous even to a want of feminacy -- she delighted to sport with ignorance and pretension, even in the highest places; and the laugh that she excited was like lightning; -- no one could divine where next it might fall.

    Ernest Maltravers — Complete

  • It was true that the sense of wrong did not break forth audibly; for, though susceptible, Isabel was meek, and her pride was concealed by the outward softness and feminacy of her temper: but she stole away from those who had wounded her heart or trampled upon its feelings, and nourished with secret but passionate tears the memory of the harshness or injustice she had endured.

    The Disowned — Volume 01

  • Educated even to learning -- courageous even to a want of feminacy -- she delighted to sport with ignorance and pretension, even in the highest places; and the laugh that she excited was like lightning; -- no one could divine where next it might fall.

    Ernest Maltravers — Volume 06

  • In a word, the face and the figure were not in harmony: the figure prevented you from pronouncing her to be masculine; the face took from the figure the charm of feminacy.

    Lucretia — Volume 01

  • An abfolutc power renders him effeminate and inactive; ef - feminacy and inaction expofe him to the con - tempt of his fubjedls, to revolts and feditions.

    The spirit of general history : in a series of lectures, from the eighth, to the eighteenth century : wherein is given a view of the progress of society, in manners and legislation during that period

  • An Act for fuppreffiQg the ef - feminacy of Englifhmen, by difappoint - ing theoi of clean linen.

    Criticisms on the Rolliad. Part the first

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