Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The transfer of a fee.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In law:
  • noun Originally, the gift of a fief or feud.
  • noun The conveyance of land by investiture, or words of donation, accompanied by livery of seizin; also, the document making such conveyance.
  • noun A like transfer or creation of any corporeal hereditament or freehold estate.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The grant of a feud or fee.
  • noun (Eng. Law) A gift or conveyance in fee of land or other corporeal hereditaments, accompanied by actual delivery of possession.
  • noun Obs. in the U.S., Rare in Eng. The instrument or deed by which corporeal hereditaments are conveyed.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun law The grant of a feud or fee.
  • noun law, UK A gift or conveyance in fee of land or other corporeal hereditaments, accompanied by actual delivery of possession.
  • noun US, UK The instrument or deed by which corporeal hereditaments are conveyed.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English feffement, from Anglo-Norman feoffement, from feoffer, to put in legal possession, from Old French fief, fief; see fee.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old French feoffement, fieffement; compare Latin feoffamentum.

Examples

  • As examples of such fundamental customs, St. Germain mentioned, inter alia, the system of courts, trial by jury, freedom from arbitrary imprisonment, feudal customs, and especially the principle of primogeniture, and the form of conveyance of land known as feoffment with livery of seisin.

    COMMON LAW

  • Cestui que (also cestuy que) (English pronunciation:/ˈsɛstwi keɪ/) is a shortened version of cestui a que use le feoffment fuit fait, literally, “The person for whose use the feoffment was made.”

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The influence of French words in English legal terminology

  • Cestui que (also cestuy que) (English pronunciation: /ˈsɛstwi keɪ/) is a shortened version of cestui a que use le feoffment fuit fait, literally, “The person for whose use the feoffment was made.”

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The influence of French words in English legal terminology

  • Middleton and Sarah Dehon of Charlestown had executed “deeds of feoffment, with livery of seisin,” in 1836, instead of using more streamlined forms.15 In the rest of the country, the enormous demand meant that land documents had to become simple and standard.

    A History of American Law

  • The old conveyance of feoffment, with livery of seizin—the turf and twig—clearly had to go.

    A History of American Law

  • The old conveyance of feoffment, with livery of seizin—the turf and twig—clearly had to go.

    A History of American Law

  • Middleton and Sarah Dehon of Charlestown had executed “deeds of feoffment, with livery of seisin,” in 1836, instead of using more streamlined forms.15 In the rest of the country, the enormous demand meant that land documents had to become simple and standard.

    A History of American Law

  • Middleton and Sarah Dehon of Charlestown had executed “deeds of feoffment, with livery of seisin,” in 1836, instead of using more streamlined forms.15 In the rest of the country, the enormous demand meant that land documents had to become simple and standard.

    A History of American Law

  • The old conveyance of feoffment, with livery of seizin—the turf and twig—clearly had to go.

    A History of American Law

  • If feoffees, who possess an estate only during the life of a son, where divers remainders are limited over, make a feoffment in fee to him, by the feoffment, all the future remainders are destroyed.

    The Life and Adventures of Sir Launcelot Greaves

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